Employment Profile

Survey results from Ontario's Colleges of Applied Arts and Technology

Glossary

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Average annual earnings by gender – full-time employment
Average annual salary of survey respondents at six months after graduation who were employed in full-time jobs. Male and female results are presented separately.
This shows how much a college graduate from a program of study earned right after graduation in a full-time job. This may differ by gender.

Average annual earnings – full-time employment
Average annual salary, at six months after graduation, of survey respondents who were employed in full-time jobs.
This shows how much a college graduate from a program of study earned in a full-time job right after graduation.

Average annual earnings – full-time related or partially related
Average annual salary, at six months after graduation, of survey respondents who were employed in full-time jobs related or partially related to their program of study.
This shows how much a college graduate earned right after graduation in a full-time job related or partially related to their program of study.

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Employer satisfaction – combined satisfaction responses
Graduates' employers were asked to rate their satisfaction with their employees' college preparation for the type of work being done. This display shows the combined count of surveyed employers who responded that they were either 'very satisfied' or 'satisfied.' The counts are shown as a percentage of all employers who answered the question.
Employer satisfaction ratings indicate whether employers feel a program of study serves their hiring needs.

Employment rate
The number of graduates who were working, shown as a percentage of program graduates in the labour force.
This shows the labour force demand for graduates from a program of study.
The employment rate plus the unemployment rate should equal 100%.

Employment rate by gender
This display shows:

    • the percentage of male graduates who were working, compared to the total male program graduates in the labour force.
    • the percentage of female graduates who were working, compared to the total female program graduates in the labour force.

This shows the labour market demand for graduates from a program of study and may differ by gender.

Employment rate – full-time
The number of graduates who were employed in at least one job requiring 30+ hours of work per week (or less if this is considered full-time employment in an occupational field), shown as a percentage of program graduates in the labour force.
This shows the labour market demand for graduates from a program of study.

Employment rate by gender – full-time
This display shows:

  • the percentage of male graduates who were employed full-time, compared to the total male program graduates in the labour force.
  • the percentage of female graduates who were employed full-time, compared to the total female program graduates in the labour force.

This shows the labour market demand for graduates from a program of study and may differ by gender.

Employment rate – full-time related or partially related
The number of graduates who were employed full-time in a job related or partially related to their program, shown as a percentage of program graduates in the labour force.
This shows the labour market demand for graduates with a skill set in that field.

Employment rate by gender – full-time related or partially related
This display shows:

  • the percentage of male graduates who were employed in a full-time job related or partially related to their program of study, compared to the total male program graduates in the labour force.
  • the percentage of female graduates who were employed in a full-time job related or partially related to their program of study, compared to the total female program graduates in the labour force.

This shows the labour market demand for graduates with a skill set in that field and may differ by gender.

Employment rate by gender – part-time
This display shows:

  • the percentage of male graduates who were employed part-time, compared to the total male program graduates in the labour force.
  • the percentage of female graduates who were employed part-time, compared to the total female program graduates in the labour force.

This shows the labour market demand for graduates from a program of study. There can be many reasons why a graduate is employed part-time and they may differ by gender. These reasons are explored in the data view, Reasons for part-time employment by gender.

Employment rate – part-time
This display shows:

The number of graduates who were employed in one or more jobs, each requiring less than 30 hours of work per week, shown as a percentage of program graduates in the labour force.

This shows the labour market demand for graduates from a program of study. There can be many reasons why a graduate is working part-time. These reasons are explored in the data view, Reasons for part-time employment.

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Graduate satisfaction – combined satisfaction responses
Graduates were asked to rate their satisfaction with the usefulness of their college education in achieving their goals after graduation. This display shows the combined count of graduates who said that they were either 'very satisfied' or 'satisfied.' The counts are shown as a percentage of all graduates who answered the question.

Graduate satisfaction ratings indicate whether graduates view their program of study as helpful in their life after graduation.

Graduates not in labour force
The number of graduates who were not employed and not looking for work, shown as a percentage of the total survey population.

This can be helpful in providing an overall picture of graduate outcomes from a program of study. There can be many reasons why a graduate is not in the labour force. These reasons are explored in the data view, Reasons for not being in the labour force.

Graduation Rate
The number of students who graduated within approximately 200 percent of their program's regular duration, shown as a percentage of program entrants. For example, students enrolled in one-year programs have a two-year window to complete their program to be included in the graduation rate.

Graduation rates indicate the likelihood of meeting the requirements to graduate from a given program.

Graduate response rate
The number of graduates who completed the Graduate Outcomes Survey, shown as a percentage of all graduates.
This shows how many graduates completed the survey in a program. Interpret the all graduate outcomes related with caution, especially where there are low response rates.

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Industries of employment
Graduates' indication of the type of business or service offered by their employer coded on the basis of the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS).

Institutions where graduates continued their education
Graduates who were studying full-time after graduation were asked which institution they were attending. Responses have been grouped by type of institution: Ontario colleges; Ontario universities; and other institutions.
This shows the most postsecondary destinations for graduates from the most recent reporting year who continued their full-time studies.

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Labour force participation
Graduates who were either employed or looking for work during the reference week.

Labour force participation rate
The number of graduates who were either employed or looking for work, shown as a percentage of the total population surveyed from the program.
This can be helpful in showing an overall picture of graduate outcomes from a program of study. There can be many reasons why a graduate is not in the labour force. These are explored in the 'Transitions after graduation' data view.

Labour force participation rate by gender
This display shows:

  • the percentage of male graduates who were either employed or looking for work, compared to the total males surveyed from the program.
  • the percentage of female graduates who were either employed or looking for work, compared to the total females surveyed from the program.

This can be helpful in providing an overall picture of graduate outcomes from a program of study. There can be many reasons why a graduate is not in the labour force and they may differ by gender.

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Not in the labour force
Graduates who, during the reference week, were unemployed and not looking for work, including those attending school full-time, travelling, or staying home for health reasons or because of family responsibilities.

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Occupational categories
Graduates' occupations classified according to Human Resources and Skills Development Canada's 2011 National Occupational Classification (NOC).

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Percentage of total graduates by gender
This display shows the number of graduates, by gender, of full-time postsecondary college programs – whether or not the graduate responded to the survey.
This shows the ratio of male to female graduates from a program of study. Some programs may appeal more strongly to one gender or another. Interpret the results with caution, especially where there are few graduates.

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Reasons for not being in the labour force
Graduates who were not in the labour force were asked for the main reason that they were not looking for employment. Responses for the most recent survey year are presented.
There are several reasons why a graduate may not be looking for employment. A graduate might be attending or planning to attend school full-time, travelling, or staying home for health reasons or because of family responsibilities.

Reasons for not being in the labour force – studying full-time or no jobs in field of study
Graduates who were not in the labour force were asked for the main reason that they were not looking for employment. Some reasons are likely to change, depending on the labour market and economic situation at the time of graduation. This display shows the importance over time of two reasons: studying full-time or that there were no jobs in the field of study.
Changes in the proportion of graduates studying full-time may indicate shifts in the entry level skills and knowledge that employers want.
Similarly, a change in the proportion of graduates who say they are not looking because there are no jobs in their field of study may show a shift in labour market demand.

Reasons for part-time employment
Graduates who were working part-time were asked to give the main reason for their part-time employment. The responses have been organized into major groups. All groups are shown for the most recent survey year.
There are several reasons why a graduate may be working part-time. The relative importance of the various reasons is shown here.

Reasons for part-time employment by gender
Graduates who were working part-time were asked to give the main reason for their part-time employment. The responses have been organized into major groups. All groups are shown for the most recent survey year. Male and female responses are presented separately.
There are several reasons why a graduate may be working part-time and they may differ by gender. The relative importance of the various reasons is shown here.

Reasons for part-time employment – labour market pressures
Graduates who were working part-time were asked to give the main reason for their part-time employment. Some reasons are likely to change, depending on the labour market and economic situation at the time of graduation. This display shows the importance over time of labour market pressures.
Part-time employment which is a result of labour market pressures may indicate a lack of demand for graduates from a program of study.

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Student satisfaction – combined satisfaction responses
Students still enrolled in their college program were asked to rate their satisfaction with the overall quality of their learning experience. This display shows the number of students who said they were either 'very satisfied' or 'satisfied,' shown as a percentage of students who answered the question.

Student satisfaction ratings indicate whether students in the program view it and their college education as a quality learning experience and relevant to their future employment.

Student Satisfaction Respondents
The number of students who completed the Student Satisfaction Survey.

This shows how many students completed the survey in a program. Interpret all student satisfaction related results with caution, especially where there are few respondents

Graduate response rate
The number of graduates who completed the Graduate Outcomes Survey, shown as a percentage of all graduates.

This shows how many graduates completed the survey in a program. Interpret the all graduate outcomes related with caution, especially where there are low response rates.

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Time needed to get a job – full-time
Graduates employed full-time were asked to report when they found employment. Some graduates found jobs before they graduated while others found jobs sometime between graduation and six months after graduation. This display only includes graduates who had found work by the end of the sixth month. What you see here is the percentage of those graduates who had found jobs at different points in time along the way. Responses for the most recent survey year are presented.
This shows the labour market demand for graduates from a program of study.

Time needed to get a full-time job by gender
Graduates employed full-time were asked to report when they found employment. Some graduates found jobs before they graduated while others found jobs sometime between graduation and six months after graduation. This display only includes graduates who had found work by the end of the sixth month. What you see here is the percentage of those graduates who had found jobs at different points in time along the way. Male and female responses are presented separately. Responses for the most recent survey year are presented.
This shows the labour market demand for graduates from a program of study and may differ by gender.

Time needed to get a job – full-time related or partially related
Graduates employed full-time in a job related or partially related to their program were asked to report when they found employment. Some graduates found jobs before they graduated while others found jobs sometime between graduation and six months after graduation. This display only includes graduates who had found related or partially related work by the end of the sixth month. What you see here is the percentage of those graduates who had found jobs at different points in time along the way. Responses for the most recent survey year are presented.
This shows the labour market demand for graduates with a skill set in that field. It could also show entry requirements for a specific occupation.

Top industries entered by graduates
Graduates were asked what type of industry they are currently working in. The top responses from the last five years are listed here.
This shows if the major industries are hiring graduates from a program of study. Industries may attract graduates from various programs. As well, some graduates may be working in jobs unrelated to their field of study. BEFORE APPLYING FOR A PROGRAM, MAKE SURE THAT IT MEETS YOUR CAREER GOALS. See: How do I find out if a program is a good fit for me?
It may also be helpful to review the 'Top industries related to graduates' fields of study' data view.

Top industries entered by graduates – full-time related or partially related

Graduates were asked what type of industry they are currently working in, and if their occupation is related to their field of study. The top responses from graduates working in jobs related or partially related to their fields of study from the last five years are listed here.
This shows if the major industries are hiring graduates in fields related or partially related to their program of study. Industries may attract graduates from various programs. BEFORE APPLYING FOR A PROGRAM, MAKE SURE THAT IT MEETS YOUR CAREER GOALS. See: How do I find out if a program is a good fit for me?

Top occupations found by graduates
Graduates were asked what type of occupation they currently have. The top responses from the last five years are listed here. Professions may attract graduates from various programs. As well, some graduates may be working in jobs unrelated to their field of study. BEFORE APPLYING FOR A PROGRAM, MAKE SURE THAT IT MEETS YOUR CAREER GOALS. See: How do I find out if a program is a good fit for me?
It may also be helpful to review the 'Top occupations related to graduates' fields of study' data view.

Top occupations found by graduates – full-time related or partially related
Graduates were asked what type of occupation they currently have, and if their occupation is related to their field of study. The top responses from graduates working in jobs related or partially related to their fields of study from the last five years are listed here. Professions may attract graduates from various programs. BEFORE APPLYING FOR A PROGRAM, MAKE SURE THAT IT MEETS YOUR CAREER GOALS. See: How do I find out if a program is a good fit for me?

Total college graduates
The number of graduates of full-time postsecondary college programs – whether or not the graduate responded to the survey.
This shows if the number of graduates from a program has changed over time and if the program's popularity has changed in comparison with other programs. Interpret all graduate outcomes related results with caution, especially where there are few graduates.

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Unemployment rate
The number of graduates who were without work but were looking for work, shown as a percentage of program graduates in the labour force.
This shows the labour force demand for graduates from a program of study.
The employment rate plus the unemployment rate should equal 100%.

Historical Ontario unemployment rates (ages 15 to 24) are also provided below for comparison:

 

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

Ontario unemployment rate (ages 15 to 24)

15.9

17.0

16.2

15.7

14.7

Source: Statistics Canada, Labour Force Survey Table 282-0002

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